Press

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Recent Press

The Open Temple is very grateful to be a part of the local and national Jewish community. Below is some of the press that we have garnered.

The Jewish Journal: Opening Hearts, Minds and a Temple

The Jewish Journal: TABLE FOR FIVE: Chukat

The Jewish Journal: Eight events, three days, one love: it’s Tu b’Av

Bridge Home Venice 

The Jewish Journal: Passover Seder Crawl: Putting the Quest into the Four Questions

The Jewish Journal: Awash in Self-Obsession 

The Jewish Journal: Letter to God

The Jewish Journal: Table For Five: Five takes on the weekly parsha

Yo! Venice: Love and Goatitude

The Argonaut: Each event is overflowing with meaning, community and fun, which spill out into their programs and events throughout the year.

The Jewish Journal: Open Temple has a very Venice vibe.

Rabbi Wolpe on worshipping in nature (and a shout out to Open Temple!): http://jewishjournal.com/culture/religion/shavuot/219649/faith-grow-must-celebrate-roots-nature/

E-Jewish Philanthropy introduces the Slingshot Class of 2017 (Open Temple featured in the first-ever Los Angeles edition): http://ejewishphilanthropy.com/introducing-the-slingshot-class-of-2017/ (also mentioned in Haaretz).

Jewish Journal on praying outside this summer: http://jewishjournal.com/culture/religion/prayer/219650/5-places-can-pray-outdoors-summer/

City Watch: Leonard Isenberg’s experience of Open Temple

The Jewish Journal: Open Templers gathered the night after Trump’s election at an impromptu Express Yourself talk circle. 

David Suissa includes Open Temple in his list of 30 of his favorite stories.

The Jewish Journal: On the night before Kol Nidre, we dunked ourselves in the ocean as a personal mikveh. 

The Argonaut: Rabbi Lori Shapiro and Open Temple took home the Spirit of Venice Award at the 2016 Abbot Kinney Festival.

The Jewish Journal: David Suissa at the Jewish Journal wrote about his experience at an Open Temple bar mitzvah celebrated at the LA Museum of the Holocaust.

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Our Torah journey begins with our first introduction. Torah comes from the root: “yud, reish, hey.” This alludes to the image of an arrow meeting its mark. Torah is not only a sacred text, a collection of cultural myths, an explanation of revelation, but it is most personally a path of Life Direction.